Friday, July 5, 2019

Who is Jeffrey Epstein, Jeffrey Edward Epstein, convicted sex offender? Parents, family, brother, biography by Mary Cummins

Jeffrey Epstein, Jeffrey Edward Epstein, sex offender, minor, family, ancestry, jewish, russia, mother, father, brother, grandparents, mary cummins, new york, florida, california, donald trump, dna, heritage
Jeffrey Epstein, Jeffrey Edward Epstein was born January 20, 1953 in Brooklyn, New York. His father was Seymour George Epstein born December 4, 1916 in New York, died December 14, 1991 in Cleveland, Ohio. His father died from an accident in Ohio. He had 12 years of education. He worked for Administration of Environmental Quality and Housing Programs per his death certificate. Per others he worked for New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. He was a groundskeeper. He enlisted and served in the military. He also previously worked as a clerk and in the automobile industry. Jeffrey's mother was Paula Stolofsky. She was born October 5, 1918 in Brooklyn, New York. She died April 1, 2004 in West Palm Beach, Florida. Jeffrey's parents were married 1952.

Per photos the family was successful. I see bat mitzvahs, parties...




Below is a pic of Jeffrey Epstein's high school yearbook 1969.

Jeffrey Epstein, Jeffrey Edward Epstein, sex offender, minor, family, ancestry, jewish, russia, mother, father, brother, grandparents, mary cummins, new york, florida, california, donald trump, dna, heritage


Jeffrey Epstein's paternal grandparents were Julius Epstein 1882-1944 and Bessie Fisher 1890-1960. They were both born in Russia. Julius Epstein was a "house wrecker," home demolisher, who completed the 8th grade. He owned his company.

Jeffrey Epstein's maternal grandparents were Max Mortchel Stolofsky born abt. 1893 in Lithuania, died 1954, and Lena Berlin, 1895 -2004. Max Stolofsky was a chauffer, driver for a furniture firm.

Jeffrey Epstein has a brother named Mark Lawrence Epstein born July 14, 1954 in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated from the same high school as Jeffrey in 1971. Below is his graduation photo. Per his yearbook, "MARK EPSTEIN, math team captain, senior grade representative, senior orchestra, math office, senior council, english office, history office." Appears they were both great at math.

Mark Epstein, Mark Lawrence Epstein, Lafayette High School 400, Class of 1971, jeffrey epstein, brother


Below is his family tree pedigree view. I just started an hour ago. This will be updated.

Jeffrey Epstein, Jeffrey Edward Epstein, sex offender, minor, family, ancestry, jewish, russia, mother, father, brother, grandparents, mary cummins, new york, florida, california, donald trump, dna, heritage
I found the below online which is an excerpt from an article.

"Jeffrey Epstein’s mother, Paula, was the daughter of Max and Lena Stolofsky, who arrived in the United States as Lithuanian refugees. Relatives on that side of the family who remained in the old country would all perish in the course of Adolf Hitler’s campaign to exterminate European Jewry.

Epstein’s father, Seymour, was a manual laborer, like his father before him. Seymour’s parents, Julius and Bessie Epstein, had emigrated from Russia and landed in Brooklyn, both of them with eighth-grade educations. They lived in Crown Heights, where Julius owned a house-wrecking company.

Before landing a job with the city, Seymour had worked with his father.

They were kind people, says Epstein’s childhood friend Gary Grossberg. Seymour was there for him at a difficult time, Grossberg says. When Grossberg was young, his parents divorced, and his father moved out of Brooklyn. Seymour and Paula took Gary in. Often they referred to him as their third son. “Paula was a wonderful mother and homemaker,” Grossberg remembers, “despite the fact that she had a full-time job.”

Epstein, as a kid, was “chubby, with curly hair and a high, ‘hee-hee’ kind of laugh,” Beverly Donatelli recalls.* Beverly was two years older than Epstein, but thanks to his precocious talents, which allowed him to skip two grades, they graduated from Brooklyn’s Lafayette High School together, in 1969.

“He was advanced,” Beverly remembers. “He tutored my girlfriend and myself in the summer. He taught me geometry in just two months.”

When Beverly thinks of Epstein now, she recalls gentler times-long strolls down the Coney Island boardwalk, roller-coaster rides, stolen kisses. “That last year in school, I think he kind of loved me,” she says. “One night on the beach he kissed me. In fact, our history teacher made up a mock wedding invitation for Jeffrey and myself to show to the class. That seems pretty inappropriate now. But back then, we all thought it was funny. Jews and the Italians, that was pretty much who went to Lafayette High School. They didn’t socialize that much. And though my mother was crazy about him, she told me Jewish boys don’t marry Italians.”

Through the haze of several decades, Beverly remembers Epstein as a kindhearted boy and something of a prodigy-a gifted young pianist as well as a math whiz.

“I was talking to my girlfriends the other day,” she says. “There is nothing but nice we can say about him. He is actually the reason I went to college.”

Beverly lost contact with Epstein over the years. But not long after Epstein’s fiftieth birthday, she got a call out of the blue.

“He had a photo of us on the beach,” she says. “A friend noticed it at his birthday party. And Jeffrey said to the friend: ‘I bet she has a big ass now.’ So Jeffrey called me and invited me to his home on 71st Street. We hung out. We reminisced. He was the same Jeffrey. A gentleman.”

The two never did speak again, but to this day Beverly sympathizes with her high school sweetheart.

“I feel so bad for him,” Beverly says. “That’s how much I liked him.”

Gary Grossberg was a year younger than Epstein and in the same class as Epstein’s kid brother, Mark, with whom Grossberg remains very friendly, though he hasn’t seen or spoken with Jeffrey in some time. Both brothers are good people, he says.

“Jeffrey’s a brilliant and good person. He is also incredibly generous.”

Grossberg says he’s talked to Epstein about “the problem in Florida.” As he sees it, Epstein “got carried away…perhaps he was hanging around with the wrong people.”

Grossberg wonders, too, if the things that made Epstein special contributed to his eventual fall from grace.

“He was a diamond in the rough, you see,” Grossberg explains. “People recognized Jeffrey’s brilliance very early on. But he had a gift for recognizing opportunities very quickly. He started buying properties in Manhattan, including 301 East 66th Street. He asked his brother-did Mark want to join him? He did.”

Grossberg himself has had his ups and downs. At one point, he worked in a building owned by the Epstein brothers. There, he says, a porter told him a story about a little-known side of Jeffrey Epstein. The porter’s wife, who lived in South America, desperately needed an organ transplant. Epstein paid for the operation.

“That’s just typical,” Grossberg says. “That’s who he always was, long as I knew him.”

“Lafayette was a city school,” says another old classmate, James Rosen. “It was functional. There was nothing special about it.”

James Rosen is a retired postal worker. He lives in South Florida now, but, like Jeffrey Epstein, he’d grown up in Sea Gate.

“There was a lot of volatility at Lafayette,” Rosen recalls. “It was a blue-collar area that was, at one time, 90 percent Italian. Then a small amount of Jews moved in, and there was anti-Semitism. The Italians didn’t want the Jews to be there.”

Black families were moving in, too, he remembers, and Hispanic ones. But he says most of the animosity was aimed at Jews.

“There were fights in the schools. They thought we were going to take over.”

But Epstein seems to have made friends easily. Even then, his buddies-who called him Eppy-could see he was special. While they hung out on the beach, Epstein played the piano. Did homework. Worked on his prized stamp collection.

Innocent times.

It’s the height of the Vietnam War. Students collide with college administrators. Hippies collide with hard hats. Kids with long hair collide with their parents. Jeffrey Epstein does not go in for any of that. At the age of sixteen, he’s taking advanced math classes at Cooper Union, an august institution in the East Village where Abraham Lincoln once spoke.

Thanks to a generous endowment, the school is tuition-free, though the application process is famously rigorous.

Epstein sails through it.

At Harvard or Yale, his accent would give him away. Epstein tawks like the Brooklyn boy he is. But Cooper Union is more open than any Ivy League school. It’s full of boys from Brooklyn, and, aside from his prodigious intellect, Epstein doesn’t stand out. He starts to make money by tutoring his fellow students. And in 1971, he leaves Cooper Union for the greener pastures of New York University, located a few blocks away. There, at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, he studies the mathematical physiology of the heart. But he never graduates from any college or university.

By 1973, Epstein is teaching at the Dalton School, a prestigious private school on the Upper East Side. Like Tavern on the Green, Grand Central Terminal, and the Century Association, Dalton is a New York institution-an elite K-12 rocket ship built for the children of New York’s ruling classes.

It’s not at all clear how Epstein, who has no college degree, ends up there.

And yet here he is, barely out of his teens and already a teacher of math and physics. “Go forth unafraid” is the Dalton School’s credo.

It’s a philosophy Epstein has adopted. For him, Dalton’s an excellent launching pad.

It’s nothing like Lafayette High School. The kids he’s teaching are rich-very rich. Their parents are extremely well connected. And despite Epstein’s outer-borough accent, he’s careful in his presentation. At any given moment, he’s one parent-teacher conference away from a whole new world of possibilities.

Because Dalton has an excellent student-to-teacher ratio, the parents get to know Epstein quite well. Before long, a Wall Street macher named Alan “Ace” Greenberg has taken a special shine to the young man who’s been tutoring his son Ted."

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.

Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, real estate, appraiser, appraisal, instructor, teacher, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, Brentwood, Bel Air, California, licensed, permitted, single family, condo, pud, hud, fannie mae, freddie mac, uspap, certified, residential, certified resident, apartment building, multi-family, commercial, industrial, expert witness, civil, criminal, orea, dre, insurance, bonded, experienced, bilingual, spanish, english, form, 1004, 2055, land, raw, acreage, vacant, insurance, cost, income approach, market analysis, comparative, theory, appraisal theory, cost approach, sales, matched pairs, plot, plat, map, diagram, photo, photographs, photography, rear, front, street, subject, comparable, sold, listed, active, pending, expired, cancelled, listing, mls, multiple listing service, claw, themls,

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